The most comprehensive educational resources for finance

Lecture 18 – Monetary Policy

To begin the lecture, Professor Shiller explores the origins of central banking, from the goldsmith bankers in the United Kingdom to the founding of the Bank of England in 1694, which was a private institution that created stability in the U.K. financial system by requiring other banks to have deposits in it. Turning his attention

Lecture 17 – Options Markets

After introducing the core terms and main ideas of options in the beginning of the lecture, Professor Shiller emphasizes two purposes of options, a theoretical and a behavioral purpose. Subsequently, he provides a graphical representation for the value of a call and a put option, and, in this context, addresses the put-call parity for European

Lecture 16 – Banking and Regulations in China with Laura Cha

This is a guest lecture by Laura Cha, former vice chair of the China Securities Regulatory Commission and a member of the Executive Council of Hong Kong. In her introductory remarks, Ms. Cha emphasizes career opportunities in the private as well as the public sector of financial markets, and elaborates on her own career as

Lecture 15 – Forward and Futures Markets

To begin the lecture, Professor Shiller elaborates on the difference between forwards and futures and on the role of futures markets to infer future prices for the underlying commodity or financial asset. Generalizing the discussion beyond futures markets to derivatives markets, he assesses the issue of speculation in those markets and its impact on capitalist

Lecture 14 – A Brief History of AIG with Maurice “Hank” Greenberg

This is a guest lecture by Maurice “Hank” Greenberg, former Chief Executive Officer at American International Group. Mr. Greenberg starts his lecture with reflections on his time in the U.S. Army during World War II and the Korean War as well as on his first job in the insurance business as a junior underwriter. Subsequently,

Lecture 13 – Overview of Banks

Banks are among our enduring of financial institutions. Their survival in so many different historical periods is testimony to their importance. Professor Shiller traces the origins of interest rates from Sumeria in 2000 BC, to ancient Greece and Rome, up to the Song Dynasty in China between the 10th and the 12th century. Subsequently, he

Lecture 12 – Misbehavior, Crises, Regulation and Self Regulation

After talking about human failures and foibles in the last lecture, this lecture is concerned with regulation to minimize the impact of human errors. Professor Shiller outlines five different levels of regulation: Regulation on the firm level, on the level of trade groups, on the regional, the national, and the international level. Concerning the first

Lecture 11 – Behavioral Finance

Deviating from an absolute belief in the principle of rationality, Professor Shiller elaborates on human failings and foibles. Acknowledging impulses to exploit these weaknesses, he emphasizes the role of factors that keep these impulses in check, specifically the desire for praise-worthiness from Adam Smith’s The Theory of Moral Sentiments. After a discourse on Personality Psychology,

Lecture 10 – Real Estate Finance

Real estate finance is so important that it has a very long and complex history. Describing the history of mortgage financing, Professor Shiller highlights the historical development of well-institutionalized property rights for mortgage contracts. Subsequently, he focuses on modern financial institutions for commercial real estate, elaborating on Direct Participation Programs and Real Estate Investment Trusts

Lecture 9 – Corporate Stocks

Professor Shiller emphasizes the worldwide importance of corporations by looking at World Bank data for corporate stocks as traded on global stock markets. He, then, turns his attention to the concept of a corporation, elaborating on the role of shareholders, the board of directors, and the Chief Operating Officer. He compares and contrasts for-profit and