The most comprehensive educational resources for finance

Cash Conversion Cycle (CCC)

Cash Conversion Cycle is an important concept in liquidity analysis. The cash conversion cycle indicates the time (no. of days) it takes for the cash invested in the business to be converted back to cash. In other words it is the total time taken to sell its inventory, collect the receivables, and pay the creditors.

Liquidity Ratios (Current Ratio, Quick Ratio, and Others)

Liquidity is a measure of how quickly a firm is able to convert its assets into cash. While analyzing the liquidity position of a company, an analyst uses the common liquidity ratios to measure the company’s ability to pay-off its short-term liabilities. There are four important liquidity ratios: Current Ratio Quick Ratio Cash Ratio Defensive

Activity Ratios – Video Summary

In the previous articles we learned about the key activity ratios: Inventory Turnover and Days of Inventory on Hand (DOH), Receivables Turnover and Days of Sales Outstanding (DSO), Payables Turnover and Number of Days of Payables, Working Capital Turnover Ratio and Fixed Asset and Total Asset Turnover Ratio. The following video from Bionic Turtle provides

Fixed Asset and Total Asset Turnover Ratio

Fixed Asset and Total Asset turnover ratios reflect how effectively the company is using its assets, i.e., their ability to generate revenue from the given assets. Fixed asset turnover ratio measures how much revenue a company generates from every dollar of fixed assets. Total asset turnover ratio measures how much revenue a company generates from

Working Capital Turnover Ratio

Working capital turnover ratio reflects how effectively the company is using its working capital. Working capital turnover ratio measures how much revenue a company generates from every dollar of capital invested during a year. Formula Example Assume that a company has $1.2 million in sales for the year. Its current assets were $700,000, and current

Payables Turnover and Number of Days of Payables

Payables turnover is an important activity ratio, and provides a measure of how effectively a business is managing its payables. The payables turnover ratio measures the number of times the company pays off all its creditors in one year. For example, a payables turnover ratio of 10 means that the payables have been paid 10

Receivables Turnover and Days of Sales Outstanding (DSO)

Receivables turnover is an important activity ratio, and provides a measure of how effectively a business is managing its receivables. The receivables turnover ratio measures the number of times the company collected its receivables during a specified period. For example, a receivables turnover ratio of 10 means that the receivables have been collected 10 times

Continuing Professional Education for CPAs

In most states, Certified Public Accountants (CPAs) are required to earn continuing professional education (CPE) credits every year to keep their licenses active. The CPE requirements are as set by the state board of accountancy and vary from state to state. The American Institute of CPAs (AICPA) also requires certain CPE for maintaining membership. For

Finance: What Managers Need to Know

This video provides a crash course in what managers need to know about finance. Joe Knight, coauthor of the Financial Intelligence series, provides an insight into what you need to know and how to read the numbers.